Condition Inspection Reports

 


 

The Basics

At the start and end of your tenancy, you and your landlord should complete move-in and move-out condition inspection reports. This is a chance to fill out a checklist and document the condition of your home. Completing this report when you move in, and then again when you move out, can help determine how much damage, if any, has been caused during your tenancy.

 


 

Approved Forms

There is a good chance your landlord will use the standard Residential Tenancy Branch (RTB) Condition Inspection Report. However, if they choose to use their own custom form, it should still contain all the standard information required by law – just like the RTB form.

Section 20 of the Residential Tenancy Regulation states that the condition inspection report must contain the following information:

  • the correct legal names of the landlord, the tenant and, if applicable, the tenant’s agent;
  • the address of the rental unit being inspected;
  • the date on which the tenant is entitled to possession of the rental unit;
  • the address for service of the landlord;
  • the date of the condition inspection;
  • a statement of the state of repair and general condition of each room in the rental unit including, but not limited to, the following as applicable:
    • entry;
    • living rooms;
    • kitchen;
    • dining room or eating area;
    • stairs;
    • halls;
    • bathrooms;
    • bedrooms;
    • storage;
    • basement or crawl space;
    • other rooms;
    • exterior, including balcony, patio and yard;
    • garage or parking area;
  • a statement of the state of repair and general condition of any floor or window coverings, appliances, furniture, fixtures, electrical outlets and electronic connections provided for the exclusive use of the tenant as part of the tenancy agreement;
  • any other items which the landlord and tenant agree should be included;
  • a statement identifying any damage or items in need of maintenance or repair;
  • appropriate space for the tenant to indicate agreement or disagreement with the landlord’s assessment of any item of the condition of the rental unit and contents, and any additional comments;
  • the following statement, to be completed by the tenant:

I, …………………………………… (tenant’s name),
[  ] agree that this report fairly represents the condition of the rental unit.

[  ] do not agree that this report fairly represents the condition of the rental unit, for the following reasons:

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

  • a space for the signature of both the landlord and tenant.

The move-out condition inspection report is also required to contain:

  • a statement itemizing any damage to the rental unit or residential property for which the tenant is responsible; and
  • if agreed upon by the tenant and landlord:
    • the amount to be deducted from the tenant’s security deposit or pet damage deposit;
    • the tenant’s signature indicating agreement with the deduction, and
    • the date on which the tenant signed.

 


 

Scheduling an Inspection

According to section 17 of the Residential Tenancy Regulation, your landlord must offer you at least two opportunities – between 8am and 9pm – to complete both the move-in and move-out condition inspections. If you do not accept their first offer, your landlord is required to serve you with the RTB form, “Notice of Final Opportunity to Schedule a Condition Inspection”. If you are still unavailable for the second opportunity, you can ask someone else to participate on your behalf. Even if you are available to participate in the inspection, you may still want to consider bringing a friend or family member. Ideally, the move-in condition inspection report should be completed on the day your tenancy begins when the rental unit is still empty of your belongings, and the move-out condition inspection should be completed on the day your tenancy ends once all your belongings have been removed from the rental unit. See sections 23 and 35 of the Residential Tenancy Act for more information.

Pets: If you get a pet after the start of your tenancy, you and your landlord are required to complete another move-in condition inspection report.

 


 

Participating in an Inspection

It can be a good idea to take photos and videos during the inspection, especially if you disagree with your landlord about the condition of the rental unit. Once you have completed the condition inspection, make sure to sign and date the report. If you disagree with your landlord about any part of the inspection, there should be space on the form to list your concerns. If you do not sign the report because you disagree with it, it may be difficult to prove that you participated in the inspection. Your landlord must give you a copy of the completed move-in condition inspection report within seven days of the inspection, and a copy of the move-out condition inspection report within 15 days of the inspection. Keep your copies in a safe place and take photos for added protection. See TRAC’s template letter, Copy of Condition Inspection Report.

 


 

Consequences for Not Following the Law

If your landlord does not give you a chance to participate in a move-in or move-out condition inspection, or does not provide you with a copy of either report within the required timelines, they lose the right to claim against your security or pet damage deposit for damage to the rental unit. Conversely, if you fail to participate in an inspection after receiving two opportunities, then you may lose the right to have your deposit(s) returned. See sections 24 and 36 of the RTA for more information.

 


 

Previous Legal Decisions

 

  • Condition inspection reports mandatory
  • Guidelines for scheduling inspections
  • Arbitrator weighs inconsistent condition inspection reports
  • Forwarding address must be given explicitly